Food

Best gluten-free flours for baking

By: Canadian Living
Canadian Living
Food

Best gluten-free flours for baking

By: Canadian Living
Fortunately for those following a gluten-free diet the availability of whole-grain gluten-free flours has increased over the last decade. This means better gluten-free baked goods. And that's a reason to celebrate...with a cookie! Gluten-Free Oatmeal Chocolate Chunk Cookies Here's a list of the gluten-free whole-grain flours we use most often in the Test Kitchen when we develop gluten-free baking recipes and the best ways to use them: Rice Flour - Rice flour (brown or white) is great to use as the major flour combined with small amounts of other flours, but not on by itself. The fine, almost sandy texture can be unpleasant unless combined with other flours. The relatively bland flavour lets the others shine through. Use white rice flour as a base when a traditional white colour is expected, such as white cakes or cupcakes. Brown Rice Flour - Milled from the whole grain, this flour has a grainy texture and a pale creamy colour just a shade darker than white rice flour. It's got a deeper, nutty flavour than it's white counterpart and is great in muffins, pancakes, breads, biscuit, cookies and other baked goods where you want a rich, nutty flavour to come through. Quinoa Flour - Because of its strong flavour quinoa flour is best used in small quantities combined with other flours, such as rice flour. It gives baked goods a tender, moist crumb and is great for pancakes and muffins. Buckwheat Flour - Although it's name might suggest otherwise, buckwheat is entirely gluten-free. Available either light (hulled) or dark (unhulled) the fine, strong flavoured flour is traditionally used in blinis, pancakes, crepes, soba noodles and in waffles. It's also great used in part for baking breads and quick breads. Chickpea Flour - Because of the high protein in chickpea (and other bean flours) the end results tend to be more tender and to rise more. However, they have strong flavours and so are best used in part with another mild-flavoured flour, such as rice, for best results. Use some chickpea and other bean flours in any baked goods, especially those with strong flavours such as molasses and brown sugar and chocolate that will 'mask' some of the bean-y flavour. Nut Flour/Meal - Made from finely ground nuts, these are what to go to when you desire a rich, nutty taste from your baked goods. Almond flour is readily available, but you can grind up many nuts and use the 'flour' as part of a baking mix. Ground hazelnuts and chocolate sound like a delicious combination for a cake! Try toasting the nuts first to further develop the nutty flavour and to dry the flour a bit prevent clumping. Gluten-free all-purpose flour blends - Many brands are available of already blended gluten-free flours. And these are great to have on hand for when the baking mood strikes and you just need to whip up a batch of these cookies. In the Test Kitchen we most often use Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free All-Purpose Baking Flour. It's readily available and has just the right blend of flours for many baking endeavours from crisp, chewy cookies to light, fluffy biscuits. Best gluten-free flours
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Food

Best gluten-free flours for baking

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