Cooking School

Gourmet pressed oils explained, and how to use them in everyday foods

Walnut oil Author: Canadian Living Credits: Walnut oil

Cooking School

Gourmet pressed oils explained, and how to use them in everyday foods

Flavourful oils pressed from fruit, seeds and nuts can make salad dressings something special. These oils pack a punch, so a little goes a long way – which is perfect, since they’re often on the pricey side.

With the exception of the grape seed oil, these oils can lose much of their distinctive taste when heated, so save them for salads and cold dishes, and refrigerate them to maintain freshness.

Gourmet oils explained and how to use them
Walnut oil: This oil is rich, nutty and redolent of walnuts; use it with boldly flavoured vinegars for a salad, such as sherry or red wine. Walnut oil from France is more flavourful than walnut oil from California.

Walnut oil vinaigrette performs double duty as both a marinade and salad dressing in our Walnut Oil-Marinated Lamb Chops.

Almond oil:
Its light almond taste is just right with delicate salad greens topped with mild goat cheese and toasted slivered almonds.

Hazelnut oil: Used sparingly, its pronounced hazelnut flavour stands up to bitter greens, such as endive and radicchio, and strong flavours, such as blue cheese.

Pumpkin seed oil: In the mountains of southeastern Austria, special pumpkins are grown to produce seeds for this high-quality oil (about $20 per 375 mL bottle). A tiny bit lends an intense taste of toasted pumpkin seed to salads, sauces, meat and fish. Austrians drizzle it over potatoes or grilled mushrooms.

Taste the traditional Austrian pairing of mushrooms and pumpkin seed oil in our crispy Wild Mushroom Crostini recipe - an excellent appetizer.

Grapeseed oil: This is a neutrally flavoured, light-bodied oil with a clean finish that lets other tastes come forward. Use it the same way as you would canola oil.

Our light-tasting Grapeseed Vinaigrette Salad compliments most menus.

Avocado oil: New Zealand produces this unctuous green oil, which has a distinct vegetable-fruit flavour. It is so thick that only half the normal amount is needed in dressings. It mixes beautifully with lemon juice and adds lively flavour and colour drizzled over vegetables.

An irresistable salad dressing, our Avocado Mayonnaise is a vibrant green sauce tasting best over tomatoes and avocadoes.

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Cooking School

Gourmet pressed oils explained, and how to use them in everyday foods

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