Cross Canada Cooks: Yukon

Discover all of the foodie delights that the Yukon has to offer, from foraged food to bountiful berries.

By Rheanna Kish and Melanie Stuparyk

Fireweed Community Market
Yukon fireweed
©iStockphoto.com/eppicphotography
Today, the Fireweed Community Market is an outdoor summer market that runs from mid-May through mid-September, with over 100 vendors throughout the year and a solid core group of 20 to 30 vendors at each weekly market.

It includes a year-round indoor office and retail space for farmers and local artisans. It also hosts the annual 12 Days of Christmas market, featuring Yukon-made foods and gifts.

The Fireweed Community Market is filling a gap by promoting local foods, arts and crafts. The incredible support of the people of Whitehorse and the surrounding area has made the growth of the market possible.

There are a few other farmer's markets across the territory that spring up occasionally, depending on the local farmers' crops and produce availability. You can find these markets in Carmacks, Dawson City, Haines Junction and other communities.

Farmgate sales are another way for farmers of the North to sell their products, and a great way to meet farmers and people who are passionate about living in the Yukon.

Wherever there are people, there is a need for food. And wherever there is a need for food, you can bet there are farmers doing extraordinary things -- even in the Yukon.

Profile:
Wild Things

Foraging, whether for greens, mushrooms or berries, is a practice as old as mankind. Recently, foraged foods have been finding their way back into foodie kitchens and haute cuisine.

Most of us have long overlooked wild edibles, but in the Yukon these tasty treasures are hard to miss, and for two transplants who have made the territory their home, foraging has become a way of life.

Ying and Eric Allen live on a few acres of land bordered by Little Fox Lake on one side and the highway to Dawson City on the other. It was the perfect location to build their Honey Shack. Selling their fireweed honey to passing tourists led them to start their local-goods company, Wild Things.

Page 2 of 6 -- Explore the wild foods of the Yukon on page 3



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