Author: Canadian Living

I first tasted bannock on a tenth grade hiking trip through the BC Lillooet Gold Rush trail. It was freshly cooked over a campfire and tasted wonderful on a cold and rainy evening. My version of stovetop bannock is jazzed up with some savoury add-ins. Served with Stuffed Pork Tenderloin, it is perfect for mopping up the delicious Maple Beer Sauce.

  • Portion size 8 servings
  • Credits : Stephanie Wren



Sage and Black Pepper Bannock: In a bowl, combine the dry ingredients and the sage. Cut in the butter until the mixture resembles small peas then add the buttermilk and stir until the mixture becomes dough. Pour the dough onto a floured surface and knead a few times, being careful not to overwork the dough. Cut the bannock into 3 /4 portions and place in a well-greased skillet, preheated over medium-high heat. Cook, covered with aluminum foil, on the stovetop for 5 / 6 minutes on each side or until puffed and nicely browned on both sides. Cool then cut in half. Yukon Mash with Chevre: Peel potatoes and place in a pot with water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook for 20 minutes or until easily pierced with a fork. Remove from heat and drain well. Add the chevre and butter to the hot potatoes and mash until well combined. Add chives, salt and pepper and mix well. Add enough buttermilk to reach desired consistency and mash or whip until beautiful. Stuffed Pork Tenderloin with Maple Beer Sauce: Stuffing: In a sauté pan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. When it starts bubbling, add the sage leaves and cook until slightly crisp, 1 / 2 minutes. Remove them from the pan and slice thinly. In the same pan, cook the Canadian bacon for a few minutes then add the chopped onion and cook until translucent. Add the sage, chopped apples, 1/3 of the bottle of beer and 1 Tbsp of the maple syrup and cook over medium heat until almost all the liquid is gone. Season the stuffing to taste with salt and pepper. Remove from heat and cool. Preheat the oven to 375F. Tenderloins: Remove the skinny end of the tenderloins so that the chunk is evenly-sized all around - save for another use - and trim off the silvery skin and some fat if necessary. To butterfly the pork, hold the tenderloin lengthwise in the palm of your hand and slice thinly from the outside edge in a spiral motion towards the center. Lay it open on a cutting board and season both sides with salt and pepper. Spread about 1/3 cup of stuffing on the cut side of the tenderloin then roll it up and secure with kitchen string. Repeat with the second one. Heat some oil over medium-high heat in an oven-proof pan and sear the tenderloin on all sides. Place the entire pan in the oven. Roast for 30 ? 35 minutes then move the stuffed pork tenderloins to a cutting board to rest while making the sauce. Place the roasting pan on the stovetop over medium heat. To make the sauce, deglaze the pan with the rest of the bottle of beer and remaining 1 Tbsp of maple syrup and simmer until reduced by half. Season the sauce to taste with salt and pepper then remove from heat. Gradually whisk in the butter until the sauce is shiny and slightly thickened. Slice the tenderloins into serving sized pieces, and serve with Yukon Mash and Sage and Black Pepper Bannock. Drizzle everything with the Maple Beer sauce. Serves 6 / 8 people.
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Stuffed Pork Tenderloin with Maple Beer Sauce