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Health headlines: A new test for Alzheimer’s risk

Canadian Living
Health

Health headlines: A new test for Alzheimer’s risk

Health News In the world of health, information is changing all the time. Scientists are constantly researching cures for diseases, conducting studies that help us better understand the human body and sifting through current health advice to see what strategies are actually going to help us live longer, healthier lives. It can be hard to keep up on it all. That’s why I’ve decided to check in on the latest in health news once a week to round up the most relevant studies that you need to know to keep yourself well. Here are three of this week’s most important stories. 1. A test is teaching us more about the risk for Alzheimer’s. Canadian researchers may have found a way to determine if you might be at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers from York University developed a test involving four visual-spatial and cognitive-motor activities on a computer. One of the most telling parts of the test, said researchers, was when participants were asked to move a mouse in the opposite direction of something on the screen. Of those who had a family history of Alzheimer’s, about 82 percent had difficulties with such a task. While we’re still not able to predict who will develop Alzheimer's—in fact, even early stages, diagnosing the disease can be troublesome—the test provides hope that we can learn more in identifying risk factors for the devastating disease. Learn 10 things you didn’t know about Alzheimer’s disease. 2. Vegetables help your mental health. It seems that vegetables aren’t just good for your physical well-being; they’re also a good sign that you’ll by happy, optimistic, resilient and have good self-esteem. According to a new study published in the BMJ Open, eating at least five fruits and vegetables a day is related to better mental health. In the study of 14,000 adults, those who reported the best mental health were far more likely to eat at least five servings a day, while those who reported drinking more alcohol or being obese were more likely to have poor mental health. Get tips on how to eat more fruits and veggies. 3. Checking work emails at home is bad for your health. According to a study published in the journal Chronobiology, employees who read work emails at home or take calls from their bosses on the weekends are more likely to complain of stress-related health problems. Of nearly 60,000 people in the study, those who engaged with work in the evenings or on weekends were more likely to experience insomnia, stomach problems, headaches, anxiety and fatigue. Just because it’s so easy to do work after hours—what with our smartphones and tablets at our fingertips wherever we go—doesn’t mean we should, say the researchers. The body actually needs down time to relax and recharge for the next day. Not sure how to do down time? Read our six simple ways to relax and recharge. (Photography: Thinkstock)
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Health headlines: A new test for Alzheimer’s risk

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