Health

This week's wellness news

Canadian Living
Health

This week's wellness news

Health News In the world of health, information is changing all the time. Scientists are constantly researching cures for diseases, conducting studies that help us better understand the human body and sifting through current health advice to see what strategies are actually going to help us live longer, healthier lives. It can be hard to keep up on it all. That’s why I’ve decided to check in on the latest in health news once a week to round up the most relevant studies that you need to know to keep yourself well. Here are three of this week’s most important stories. 1. Your environment could contribute to your breast cancer risk. A new U.S. study on rats has found that exposure to everyday chemicals can cause breast cancer. The carcinogenic chemicals include those in gasoline, vehicle exhaust, flame-retardants, paint removers, tobacco smoke, charred food and cleaning solvents. The scary thing is that just about every woman in the world has been exposed to at least some of these things, but it’s an important reminder to limit your exposure and to try to surround yourself in a chemical-free environment. There are some things you can do to limit your exposure: Don’t idle your car, avoid charred food and buy furnishings that have not been treated with flame-retardants. Learn more ways to help the environment and your health. 2. Smoking is something you can pass on to your kids. It’s no surprise that kids pick up habits from their parents, but a new study from the Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., has found that the longer kids are exposed to their parents’ smoking, the more likely they are to become smokers themselves. The study, which followed 400 teens, found that those who had parents who were smokers were 10 times more likely to smoke, with each year of their parents’ addiction increasing those odds. If you’ve never considered your own health a good enough reason to quit smoking, the future health of your child might be the incentive you need. 3. Wine and chocolate aren’t the cure-alls we hoped they would be. The latest study on red wine consumption has found no association between resveratrol and less inflammation or heart disease. In the study that looked at resveratrol’s health effects on the larger population, researchers found no differences in rates of death, heart disease, inflammation or cancer. Researchers still say that wine and chocolate can be a part of a healthy diet, but we shouldn’t expect any miraculous benefits from them. And while resveratrol in the general population’s diet might not have huge health impacts, larger doses could still have benefits. While one single food may not transform your health, it’s still a good idea to get a range of antioxidants to fight free radical damage and inflammation. Learn about the best antioxidant-rich foods and power plant foods to add to your plate. (Photography: Thinkstock)  
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This week's wellness news

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