Health

This week's wellness news

By: Canadian Living
Canadian Living
Health

This week's wellness news

By: Canadian Living

Health News In the world of health, information is changing all the time. Scientists are constantly researching cures for diseases, conducting studies that help us better understand the human body and sifting through current health advice to see what strategies are actually going to help us live longer, healthier lives. It can be hard to keep up on it all. That’s why I’ve decided to check in on the latest in health news once a week to round up the most relevant studies that you need to know to keep yourself well. Here are three of this week’s most important stories. 1. Being overweight is never healthy. This study has been getting all kinds of press this week, but if you haven’t heard it yet, here’s the scoop: Being heavy and healthy isn’t entirely possible. According to researchers from Mount Sinai in Toronto, even when numbers like blood pressure and cholesterol appear normal, extra weight still puts people at an increased risk of dying of heart disease. They studied 60,000 adults while tracking their weight and heart health, and found that people who were considered medically obese but did not have other risk factors were still 24 percent more likely to have a heart attack, stroke or die from a heart-related event. Not sure if you’re at risk? Learn how to decode your BMI (which can measure obesity) here. 2. Men are from Mars, women are from Venus. Or something like that. New research from Penn Medicine shows that men and women’s brains are actually built differently. While men have better connections from the front to back of their brains (seeming to suggest they might be built to support coordinated action), women’s brains had more connections from the left to right (which make for better links between analytical and intuitive regions). These differences, however, are not present at birth but seemed to be formed during adolescence and beyond. 3. Toxins from your electronics could cause a stroke. A study has found a new cause of strokes: tungsten, a metal used in electronics and lightbulbs. Researchers followed well over 8,000 patients for 12 years and found that those who had higher levels of tungsten in their urine were more likely to have strokes, even when controlling for other stroke risk factors, such as age, body mass index and smoking. Researchers are concerned that exposure to tungsten, which is found in cellphones and computers, is going to be more prevalent in coming years, and people could be at greater risk if it leaks into our environment through manufacturing. (Photography: Thinkstock)
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This week's wellness news

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