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Personality test: What type are you?

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Culture & Entertainment

Personality test: What type are you?

  The MBTI test offers insight into human behaviour If I hadn't pursued a career in journalism during my post-secondary studies, I would definitely have explored psychology (well, maybe after I considered veterinary medicine). I love examining the human psyche, including my own and those of the people who surround me. It's helped me understand my strengths and shortcomings, and, perhaps more importantly, allowed me to read others better and leverage personality types both personally and professionally. So what better way to spend a few mindless minutes than to learn about what makes you tick and how your personality interacts with your peers? Forget those Cosmopolitan-style quizzes that factor in questions about where your favourite vacation destination falls on a world map. Questions in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test actually relate to how you think, feel, act and react. Developed by author Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Briggs Myers, the MBTI is a psychometric questionnaire based on the theories of psychotherapist Carl Jung, the founder of analytical psychology. While the MBTI test costs US$150 when administered through the Center for Applications of Psychological Type, there are a few online variations that are both accurate and insightful. My favourite? Digital Citizen's free personality assessment combines the MBTI (which focuses on how people think and feel) with the Keirsey Temperament Sorter (which more closely looks at behaviour). Users of the questionnaire are designated as one of 16 personality types based on a unique combination of four dynamics: attitudes or orientations (extraversion versus introversion and judging versus perceiving) and mental functions (sensing versus intuition, and thinking versus feeling). You're assigned a four-letter combination which is your personality profile. For me, I was scored as being an INFJ personality, meaning I scored higher for introversion, intuition, feeling and judging than their categorical counterparts listed above. Don't have access to Microsoft Excel to take Digital Citizen's personality assessment? The Jung Typology Test (available through HumanMetrics.com) is also based on MBTI dynamics, though I've found the results to be less accurate than through Digital Citizen. Ready to get started? Take the test here. (Photo courtesy Dreamstime/Phil Date)
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Personality test: What type are you?

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