Pets

10 plants that are toxic to pets

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Pets

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Plants help liven up your home but pet owners should be extra diligent when it comes to certain flowers and greenery as they can be extremely toxic to your fur babies. If your dog or cat has ingested any of the mentioned plants, contact the Pet Poison Helpline or your local veterinarian. 

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10 plants that are toxic to pets

Aloe Vera

This common succulent is known to be a great solution to relieve burns but did you know that it's toxic to both cats and dogs? Symptoms of aloe poisoning include diarrhea, vomiting, loss of appetite, depression, tremors and a change in urine color. Typically, symptoms begin to show about six to twleve hours after ingesting but if you fear your fur baby has nibbled on some, don't wait—get peace of mind and seek medical assistance to avoid any further complications. How to curb food aggression in dogs

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: FlickrCC/veggiefrog

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Calla Lily

Calla lillies, although quite beautiful, contain insoluble crystals of calcium oxalate that are  toxic to dogs and cats if ingested. Symptoms of poisoning may be seen almost immediately and include pawing at face, drooling, foaming and vomiting. More severe symptoms include swelling of the lips, tongue, oral cavity and upper airway, making it difficult to breathe or swallow. In most cases where a pet eats a plant containing calcium oxalate, treatment can be managed at home by rinsing your pet's mouth thoroughly, but it's always best to seek medical advice from your vet.

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: FlickrCC/Neil Conway

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Heartleaf Philondrean

This easy-to-grow houseplant contains a chemical that is toxic to cats and dogs. If consumed, your pet may experience mouth irritation, increased salivation, vomiting and difficulty swallowing. If you want to keep this plant in your home, be sure to store it in a place that is out of reach to ensure your pet's safety. How to keep your pet safe and healthy this summer

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10 plants that are toxic to pets

Hyacinth

Hyacinth's toxicity is highly concentrated in the bulbs as oppose to the leaf and when ingested in large amounts, can result in problems for your pet. Depending on the amount ingested, symptoms can be moderate to severe and include irritation to the mouth and esophagus, profuse drooling, vomiting and diarrhea. In severe situations, symptoms range from increased heart rate to changes in respiration and difficulty breathing. If you fear your dog or cat has ingested hyacinths, contact your vet for treatment recommendations.

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: FlickrCC/ms_bulsara

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Satin Pathos

Like the calla lily, the satin pathos plant contains calcium oxalate. If massive amounts of plants containing this toxin are consumed, the symptoms become much more severe and include convulsions, renal failure, coma and death. It's possible for your pet to recover from severe calcium oxalate poisoning, but in most cases permanent liver and kidney damage will have already occurred. 8 ways to keep your dog healthy

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: Getty Images

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Daffodil

Daffodils pose a danger to dogs and cats if ingested. Symptoms can include severe gastrointestinal issues like vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain, low blood pressure, lethargy and kidney damage. There is no specific treatment or antidote for daffodil ingestion, but you can rinse any existing plant matter from your pet's mouth thoroughly to prevent further damage. If your pet's vomiting or diarrhea is extensive, take them to the vet.

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: Getty Images

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Asparagus Fern

The asparagus fern is another common houseplant and can be toxic to your dog and/or cat if ingested and can also cause minor skin irritation in pets with sensitive skin. Beware the berries, as they are more toxic to your pet than the foliage and thus cause more serious symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. Since treatment is generally symptomatic, most pets will make a full recovery in 24 to 48 hours, but always consult with your veterinarian if you're concerned. 5 reasons you shouldn't declaw your cat

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: Getty Images

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Tulip

Tulips can signify that spring has finally sprung but that doesn't mean they're safe for your dog or cat to be around. If ingested, tulips can cause depression, severe vomiting and diarrhea, excessive drooling and loss of appetite. Induce vomiting and seek veterinary help.

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: Getty Images

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Jade Plant

This common houseplant is know for it's hard-to-kill properties and can not only cause vomiting and diarrhea if ingested, it can also cause skin irritation if your pet is exposed to it repeatedly. Keep the plant in an out-of-reach spot or in a room where you can close the door to keep your fur baby away.

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: Getty Images

10 plants that are toxic to pets

Azalea

This flowering shrub can do serious damage to your dog or cat depending on the amount consumed. Symptoms can vary from excessive drooling, sweating (nose and foot pads), vomiting, diarrhea and low blood pressure to more serious side effects such as total loss of coordination, severe muscular weakness, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, coma and possibly death. If a small amount is consumed by your pet, don't fret! The toxin found in azaleas is metabolized and excreted rapidly, so your pet will generally begin to feel better within hours and can make a full recovery in 24 hours. However, if large amounts are ingested, activated charcoal should be administered to your pet repeatedly on the first day. As always, consult your vet. 7 ways to cope with losing a pet

Image by: Canadian Living By: Linda Cotrina Source: Getty Images
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