Travel

9 things you'll love in Sevilla, Spain

Author: Canadian Living

Travel

9 things you'll love in Sevilla, Spain

For over two thousand years Sevilla has stretched along the banks of the Guadalquivir at the foot of the Campiña hills, dominating plains crisscrossed by rivers which flow down from the surrounding sierras. Nowadays it is a busy capital with much to delight art-lovers, food-lovers and night owls beyond its modern neighbourhoods and wide, congested avenues. Stroll through the network of little streets in the city centre dotted with small shaded squares, and see the splendid palaces and church treasures. There you can get a taste of the city's refined lifestyle in the cool, fragrant gardens and enjoy a tapas snack to perk you up at the counter of one of the bars filled with delicious hams sitting in a row. This is also a theatrical city, where archetypes of passion such as Don Juan, Figaro and Carmen fulfilled their destinies. Sevilla excites religious fervour and profane appetites through its Holy Week processions and ferias. Discover Sevilla in its suit of lights and the hidden city that awakens while the sun sleeps. Have a safe journey!

Practical information
Tourist Office: Oficina municipal de turismo, Paseo de las Delicias, 9
41012 Sevilla – Tel: 00 34 954 234 465 – Mon.-Fri. 8.20am-8.45pm, Sat.-Sun. 9am-2pm.

1. The Cathedral and the Giralda
This is the largest Gothic cathedral in Spain. Built over an entire century, this huge stone vessel opens through eight doors which, although from different eras, do not destroy the unity of the whole with its early Renaissance elements.

The Capilla Mayor, protected by a magnificent gate, houses a huge Flemish retable completed in 1525.

A few steps away stands the Giralda, the true symbol of Sevilla. This former minaret is a masterpiece of Alomohade architecture. The understated decor and materials are a sign of the austere aesthetics of the Almohades, who broke completely with the luxuriant decorative art of the Cordoba califate.

2. Real Alcázar
The royal palace of Sevilla, built over an Arab fortress, provides an extraordinary summary of Sevilla’s architectural history.

The Palacio del Rey Don Pedro (Palace of King Pedro I) is a magnificent expression of the Mudejar style. Reigning in a period of dynastic rivalries and feudal conflicts, Pedro I, known as "the Cruel" by his enemies, called upon his ally, the Nasride king of Granada, for help.

The gardens have unfortunately gone from the patios, replaced by marble paving, but they now cover 80 per cent of the area south of the palatial complex. Like the palace itself, they still retain the mark of their original creators despite successive transformations.

Are you travelling soon? Be prepared with our handy traveller's checklist.

Page 1 of 3 - more great travel tips for Sevilla, Spain on page 2.


The Travel News Agency (TNA) is a press agency integrated within Michelin’s Maps and Guides Division. We provide tourism-oriented news, papers and in-depth articles to clients ranging from major western newspapers to Asian travel guides. Our worldwide network of journalists delivers the latest and finest content in the fields of gastronomy, travels, art exhibitions and popular destinations. Director of the TNA, Gautier Battistella is a journalist, writer and long-time traveler. Each month, he sheds a new, very personal light on the countries, cities and events which make the headlines. Just follow the guide and enjoy the tour. Bon Voyage!


3. Barrio de Santa Cruz
Visit this quarter early in the morning as it is sliding into the day, before the tourist groups arrive. Lined on the south by the gardens of the Alcázar, the Barrio de Santa Cruz stretches East from the central area to Santa María la Blanca church. This is the quarter of Sevilla which has best preserved its medieval aspect. Its network of alleys and narrow winding streets suddenly opens onto pretty little squares with benches covered in azulejos tiles, shaded by orange trees.

4. Casa de Pilatos
The Casa de Pilatos − one of Sevilla's architectural wonders − was erected on the square which bears its name, laid out to highlight the building's façade. The palace is predominantly mudejar, blending numerous elements in the flamboyant Gothic and Renaissance styles, and bearing witness to Sevilla's golden age. It was the huge fortune and luxurious tastes of Don Fadrique, first Marquis of Tarifa, and his successors, the Dukes of Alcalá, which enabled the full expression of mudejar decorative arts, as well as the vast collections of sculptures, furniture and paintings from all over Europe.

The two gardens are cool havens of peace and quiet. Linger a while in the large garden bathed in the scent of orange trees, bougainvilleas and roses, with Italian loggias housing Renaissance sculptures.

5. Museo de Bellas Artes
Sevilla's Fine Arts Museum has exhibited its collections in the former Convento de la Merced since 1841. The convent, built under the direction of Juan de Oviedo, is one of the attractions of the museum, which provides a panorama of Sevillian painting. A pleasant square with a statue of Murillo lines the entrance to the museum topped by a Baroque gate.

6. Wild Sevillian nights
Now you have had a taste of the beautiful Andalusian city with its Muslim splendours and palaces glowing in the sun's golden rays. But there is a more fiery side to Sevilla, a city known for Spanish nights which intoxicate the senses in a whirlwind of guitars, dances and colours after the sun sets and its lanterns are lit. In this town that is passionate about its celebrations, your Andalusian nights will be as fine as your days.

Page 2 of 3 - more great ways to enjoy Sevilla, Spain on page 3.


The Travel News Agency (TNA) is a press agency integrated within Michelin’s Maps and Guides Division. We provide tourism-oriented news, papers and in-depth articles to clients ranging from major western newspapers to Asian travel guides. Our worldwide network of journalists delivers the latest and finest content in the fields of gastronomy, travels, art exhibitions and popular destinations. Director of the TNA, Gautier Battistella is a journalist, writer and long-time traveler. Each month, he sheds a new, very personal light on the countries, cities and events which make the headlines. Just follow the guide and enjoy the tour. Bon Voyage!


7. Flamenco evenings
Flamenco is the eternal symbol of Andalusia and, fortunately, is not limited to exaggerated performances designed for tourists. In Sevilla, flamenco has remained a tradition that is very much alive and continues to evolve and experiment with new forms while preserving its great classics. Flamenco bars, which offer concerts on certain days of the week, are the main places to go in search of its heart and soul. One of these is Casa Anselma (Calle Pages del Coro n°49) where the proprietress sings after serving drinks to her guests. Another place where you can learn about the different styles of traditional flamenco is the Casa da Memoria de Al-Andalus (Calle Ximenez de Ensisco n°28, 00 34 954 560 670), a kind of flamenco cultural centre where concerts featuring young talents from the flamenco scene take place every evening on the beautiful patio of a palace.

8. Theatre and opera
Sevilla is also a city of amorous passion where Don Juan, Figaro and Carmen lived out their romantic destinies. Why not take advantage of the city's wealth of cultural events by attending the theatre or the opera? The Teatro de la Maestrenza holds numerous concerts and performances. Contemporary composers are featured along with zarzuelas, a form of operetta blending musical theatre and dance. Finish off the evening in one of the city's chic bars in the Arenal quarter (Garlochi, Calle Boteros n°26, Bar Bestiario, Calle Zaragoza).

9. An evening in Triana
The Triana quarter, located on the West bank of the Guadalquivir River, has no great churches or princely palaces. But it does still have a number of craftsmen's workshops. Set aside a few hours one afternoon to walk across the bridge and visit its pottery and ceramics workshops. The craftsmen, centred around Calle Alfareria, have preserved an art using enamel and ceramics. At nightfall head towards the Plaza del Altonezo to get to Calle Betis, a street that runs along the river below it. Enjoy the lively atmosphere on this famous street with its many bars where Sevillians come to cool off on the riverbank. From here you can watch the lights of the city gradually being lit.

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The Travel News Agency (TNA) is a press agency integrated within Michelin’s Maps and Guides Division. We provide tourism-oriented news, papers and in-depth articles to clients ranging from major western newspapers to Asian travel guides. Our worldwide network of journalists delivers the latest and finest content in the fields of gastronomy, travels, art exhibitions and popular destinations. Director of the TNA, Gautier Battistella is a journalist, writer and long-time traveler. Each month, he sheds a new, very personal light on the countries, cities and events which make the headlines. Just follow the guide and enjoy the tour. Bon Voyage!


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9 things you'll love in Sevilla, Spain

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