Health

Do you pee when you exercise?

By: Canadian Living
Canadian Living
Health

Do you pee when you exercise?

By: Canadian Living
You've probably heard of Kegel exercises. Kegels involve contracting the sling of muscles that hold in your uterine organs, also known as your pelvic floor muscles. Why do you need to strengthen your pelvic floor? These muscles help you maintain your bladder function, prevent uterine prolapse (a weakening of the pelvic floor in which the uterus slips down into or protrudes out of the vagina), as well as rectum and bladder prolapse. These muscles can also affect your sexual experience. Basically, these muscles are pretty darn important and most women don't even know about them. (Side note: Men also have a pelvic floor!) pelvic floor workout Not sure how to find your pelvic floor muscles? Next time you're going to the bathroom, try to stop the stream of urine. Those muscles are the ones you're focusing on during Kegels. But Kegels may not be enough. Around 3.3 million Canadians (or 10 percent of the population) will experience some form of urinary incontinence (UI) in their lifetime. Multiple pregnancies, high-impact exercise and aging can all make incontinence issues worse. What's a gal to do? If you're leaking unexpectedly we've got the workout for you from  Core Expectation's Samantha Montpetit-Huynh. [HTML1] Watch the  full workout here. Read our May 2014 issue of Canadian Living for more information on women's sexual health and how to strengthen your pelvic floor.  (Find it on newsstands on March 31st.) 
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Do you pee when you exercise?

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