Fitness

How to get in a full-body workout—without hitting the gym

By: Jill Buchner / Photography by Andrew Grinton
How to get in a full-body workout at home

Fitness

How to get in a full-body workout—without hitting the gym

By: Jill Buchner / Photography by Andrew Grinton

From lunges to overhead presses, our do-it-all workout routin gets your heart rate up, builds muscles and burns calories.

If you're exhausted just thinking about what you need to accomplish at the gym—get your heart rate up, build muscle, protect your bones—you're not alone. This dynamic routine from certified personal trainer Justine Keyserlingk, owner of Toronto's Just Get Fit, lets you target all of your health goals in a single session.

Do this eight-move workout two or three times a week, interspersing cardio (running, walking or cycling) in between. And as always, if you feel any pain while exercising, stop and consult a health-care provider.

1. Lateral lunge with overhead press
Standing with your feet together and holding weights at your shoulders, take a large step to the left, bending your left knee and keeping your right leg straight. Send energy through your left heel to push yourself back to centre, then lift the weights overhead, extending your arms. Lower the weights to your shoulders. Do 10 reps before switching to the opposite side.



A. Lifting weights overhead gives your heart a workout; your blood needs to pump against gravity.

B. Simultaneously working your arms and legs uses multiple large muscle groups, which means you're burning more calories.

C. Studies have shown that resistance training, also called weight training, may improve bone mineral density in the spine, hips and wrists.

2. One-legged dead lift
Standing with your feet together and holding weights at your sides, slowly hinge forward at the hips while bending your left knee slightly and extending your right leg behind you. Lower your torso and lift your right leg until both are parallel to the floor, keeping your back straight and your arms extended downward. Send energy through your left heel to lift your torso and return to a standing position. Do 10 reps before switching to the opposite side.



A. This move works often-forgotten muscle groups: the glutes and the hamstrings.

B. Standing on one leg improves your balance, which may help prevent falls. And that stretch you feel in your hamstring promotes flexibility—being limber protects against future muscle injuries.

Tip: If you have trouble balancing, start by holding onto the back of a chair with one hand.

3. Sumo squat with biceps curl
Stand with your feet a little more than shoulder-width apart, with your hips, knees and feet turned out slightly. Engaging your core and holding weights in front of your hips, palms facing forward, lower your bum, as far as you can go, into a squat. Make sure your knees don't extend past your toes. Send energy through your heels to return to standing, then bend your elbows to pull the weights toward your shoulders. Do 20 reps.



A. This load-bearing exercise not only builds bone density but also increases strength and stability, preventing falls that put bones at risk.

B. This move will help tone your abdominals, biceps, inner thighs and glutes.

C. Strengthening these muscles will give your resting metabolism a boost, so you will burn more calories per day.

4. Plyometric lunge
Standing with your feet together, step forward into a lunge with your left foot, bending both knees at 90 degrees. Your right heel should be lifted and your left knee shouldn't extend past your toes. As you step forward, swing your right arm forward and your left arm backward. Keeping your torso upright and engaging your abdominals, jump, simultaneously switching your arms and legs to land in a lunge on the opposite side. Do 20 reps.


A. The impact of landing in a lunge can help build bone mass and enhance joint stability. Take care, however, if you have existing joint problems—plyometric (explosive) exercises can contribute to joint strain.

B. The jumping motion requires you to lift your body weight with each rep, giving your heart a workout. This dynamic exercise adds a calorie-burning cardio element.

Tip: If you're having trouble keeping your balance during this fast-paced move, add a small pulse or bounce to each lunge before jumping into the next one.

5. Renegade row
Holding a weight in each hand, start in a plank position, with your arms and legs extended, your feet hip-width apart and your hands directly below your shoulders. Keeping your hips parallel to the floor, bend your left arm, lifting the weight toward your underarm. Return the weight to starting position. Repeat on the opposite side. Do 20 reps.



A. This move helps open up the chest and shoulders. Over time, it can contribute to improved posture and help protect against spine curvature.

B. This exercise will sculpt your shoulders, triceps, abdominals, obliques and upper back. It's easy to develop muscle imbalances because day-to-day activities often involve pushing movements. The pulling action of this exercise helps rebalance muscle groups, which can decrease the risk of injury.

6. Cross-body mountain climber
Start in a plank position, with your arms and legs extended, your feet hip-width apart and your hands directly below your shoulders. Without moving your arms, quickly draw your left knee toward your right elbow, then return your left leg to starting position. Repeat on the opposite side. Do 20 reps.



A. If you do this move regularly, you'll notice more definition of your triceps, abdominals, obliques and shoulder muscles.

B. This high-intensity movement will get your heart rate up, improving your cardiovascular fitness.Because this exercise demands energy from your whole body, you'll burn extra calories.

7. Side plank with hip drop
Lying on your right side, stack your left leg on top of your right leg, with your right forearm on the floor, your elbow aligned directly under your shoulder, and your left arm extended upward. Press into your right forearm and lift your right hip, creating a long diagonal line with your body. Slowly lower your right hip to tap the floor, then return to the lifted position. Do 10 reps before switching to the opposite side.



A.  This exercise will help define your obliques, abdominals and lower back.

B. Strengthening one side of the body at a time can prevent muscle imbalances, while core strengthening aids in stabilization.

8. Russian twist
Sit on the floor, with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor, holding a weight in front of your chest. Leaning back to engage your core, lift your feet a few inches. Then, with hips facing forward, rotate your upper body to the left and tap the weight on the floor. Next, rotate to the right, tapping the weight on the right side. Do 20 reps.



A. If you do this exercise regularly, you'll see increased definition of your abs, obliques and lower-back muscles.

B. This rotational movement strengthens the muscles necessary for twisting and turning—motions that often cause injury in day-to-day life.

Tip: If you have lower-back problems, do this exercise without lifting your feet.

For more fun workout routines, visit our Fitness channel.

This story was originally part of "The Do-It-All Workout" in the April 2016 issue. Subscribe to Canadian Living today and never miss an issue!
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How to get in a full-body workout—without hitting the gym

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