Prevention & Recovery

Canada's latest vaccination schedule for you and your teen

Author: Canadian Living

Prevention & Recovery

Canada's latest vaccination schedule for you and your teen

If you're like most people, you can barely keep track of your own immunizations, never mind your teen's. But adults and adolescents still need to keep their immunizations updated to keep themselves and those around them healthy - especially infants.

Do you know the latest immunization schedule recommended by Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization? Does your province or territory cover these recommendations?

We've listed the vaccines you and/or your teen needs - based on age - according to the latest Canadian Immunization Guide, plus whether or not your province or territory has a publicly funded immunization program for the vaccine.

Recommended adolescent vaccine #1: Tdap vaccine
What is it for?
Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (whooping cough)
This is the adult/adolescent formulation, it’s a booster for those who received Tdap as infants.

Where and when is it funded?

British Columbia
Grade 9
Alberta Grade 9
Saskatchewan Grade 8
Manitoba Grade 9
Ontario Grade 9
Quebec Grade 10
New Brunswick Grade 9
Nova Scotia Grade 9
Prince Edward Island Grade 9
Newfoundland & Labrador Grade 9
Northwest Territories Grade 9
Yukon Territories Grade 9
Nunavut Grade 9

Recommended adolescent vaccine #2: HPV
What is it for? Human Papillomavirus (genital warts)
This vaccine is for girls only. The second dose is given two months after the first, and the third dose six months after the second. Check with your province or territory's Ministry of Health if one, two or all three doses are funded.

Where and when is it funded?

British Columbia Grade 6
Alberta Grade 5
Saskatchewan Grade 6
Manitoba Grade 6
Ontario Grade 8
Quebec Grade 4 and Secondary 3rd
New Brunswick Grade 7
Nova Scotia Grade 7
Prince Edward Island Grade 6
Newfoundland & Labrador Grade 6
Northwest Territories not funded
Yukon Territories Grade 5
Nunavut not funded


HB, Men-C and MMR schedules on page 2Recommended adolescent vaccine #3: HB (if not given in infancy)
What is it for? Hepatitis B
The hepatitis B vaccine can be routinely given to infants or pre-adolescents, depending on the provincial/territorial policy.

Where and when is it funded?

British Columbia Grade 6
Alberta Grade 5
Saskatchewan Grade 6
Manitoba Grade 4
Ontario Grade 4
Quebec Grade 4
New Brunswick not funded
Nova Scotia not funded
Prince Edward Island not funded
Newfoundland & Labrador Grade 4
Northwest Territories not funded
Yukon Territories under 19, not previously immunized
Nunavut not funded

Recommended vaccine #4: Men-C
What is it for? Meningococcal C conjugate
The meningococcal type C bacteria causes serious infections, including meningitis.

Where and when is it funded?

British Columbia Grade 6
Alberta not funded
Saskatchewan Grade 6
Manitoba not funded
Ontario Grade 7 and 15 to 19 years old
Quebec not funded
New Brunswick not funded
Nova Scotia 14 to 16 years old
Prince Edward Island not funded
Newfoundland & Labrador Grade 4 and Grade 9
Northwest Territories not funded
Yukon Territories Grade 9 and if leaving post-secondary
Nunavut 14 to 16 years old

Note:
A new conjugate vaccine has recently been released, protecting against all four meningococcal diseases (A, C, Y and W-135). The above recommended vaccine protects only against the meningococcal-C strain. While this new vaccine - Menactra - is not funded in all provinces or territories, it is worthwhile for parents to investigate with their family physicians.

Recommended adolescent vaccine #5: MMR, for high-risk adolescents
What is it for? Measles, mumps and rubella
Where and when is it funded? MMR is only funded in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island if your child is in Grade 9.
MMR is also funded in Northwest Territories if your child is leaving the territory to attend college or university.

See page three for adult (18+) vaccination schedules
Age 18+
Routine vaccinations recommended for adults:

Adults are busy, and tend to forget their immunizations. To help you remember, consider revisiting your immunization records with each mid-decade birthday, for example, at 25, 35, 45 etc. Currently, only the Tetanus and diphtheria combination vaccines require a booster in adulthood, while influenza vaccine needs to be updated every year because the influenza strains change each year.

Adult vaccinations and boosters may or may not incur a fee. Check with your health care coverage plan or ask your physician.

Recommended adult vaccine #1:
Td; Tdap
What are they for?
Tetanus and diphtheria; Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (whooping cough)
If you have no record or an unclear history:
  • Receive your first dose as soon as possible
  • Second dose is 4 to 8 weeks later
  • Third dose - Tdap to protect against pertussis -  6 to 12 months later.
Booster schedule: Get your Td every 10 years. If you're due for a booster, are around infants or have never received immunization for pertussis, get a Tdap.

Recommended adult vaccine #2:
Influenza
What is it for? The flu virus. This vaccine is intended for adults over 65, adults under 65 at risk of influenza complications, or those wishing to be protected
Booster schedule: Every autumn

Recommended adult vaccine #3: MMR
What is it for?
Measles, mumps and rubella: For high-risk individuals or those not immunized in childhood, between the ages of 2 to 55 years. 
If you have no record or an unclear history: Generally 1 dose of MMR is sufficient. A second dose may be recommended for those at higher risk.
Booster schedule: Not required
**MMR is fully funded in Newfoundland & Labrador in the event of an outbreak.

Recommended adult vaccine #4: Varicella
What is it for?
The Chicken Pox, recommended for susceptible adults
If you need this vaccine: Doses one and two are at least 4 weeks apart
Booster schedule: Not recommended

There are more vaccines recommended for adults, depending on risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. Find out more from the Public Health Agency of Canada at www.phac-aspc.gc.ca.

Sources and more information:

Recommended immunization of adults
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cig-gci/p03-02-eng.php

Publicly funded immunization programs in Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/im/ptimprog-progimpt/table-1-eng.php
and
http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/immunization/VaccinationChild.htm#table1

Recommended Immunization Schedule - Public Health Agency of Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cig-gci/p03-01-eng.php

Vaccinations explained by the Canadian Pediatric Society
http://www.cps.ca/English/Publications/Bookstore/GettingYourShots.htm

Canadian Immunization Guide - 7th Edition
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cig-gci/index-eng.php
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Canada's latest vaccination schedule for you and your teen

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